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Experiential Workshop: Emptying Containers With Music

EMPTYING CONTAINERS WITH MUSIC: USING MUSIC TO EXPLORE THE SOURCE OF VICARIOUS TRAUMA AND BURNOUT AND EMPTYING THE CONTAINERS

Experiential Workshop with Dr. Heidi Ahonen

Location: Helsinki City Mission

AIKA: 8.9. 2012 klo: 09-14

Are you a helping professional, therapist, nurse, social worker, pastor, rescue worker or counsellor? Do you work with traumatized people? Do you witness or share heartbreaking experiences day after day? This experiential workshop is ideal for those who listen to the traumatic experiences of others and find those experiences to be traumas that burdens them as well. Vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue affect helping professionals’ physical, psychological and spiritual health as they observe and interact in daily traumatic accounts or react to the traumatic situations of others. Vicarious trauma and compas-sion fatigue not only steal away a helping professional’s passion, but also deteriorates their health. Many of us have unknowingly experienced it. It manifests as a sense of helplessness and ultimately leads to burnout and depression if disregarded. During this experiential workshop a variety of music therapy techniques will be used to help participants identify and explore their vicarious traumatization, burnout, stress and resources.


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thumbnail Musiikki – sanaton kieli : musiikkiterapian perusteet: Finnish zoom
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thumbnail Different Forms of Music Therapy and Working Styles of Music Therapists— A qualitative study zoom
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Group‑analytic Music Therapy Paper

Group‑analytic music therapy

Ahonen-Eerikainen, Heidi (2002)

Abstract

This paper will focus on the practical application of the group–analytic music therapy model I developed during my group–analytic training in 1995–1999 (Ahonen–Eerikäinen 1999) and discuss and illustrate how dreams and musical images can be used as a pathway to the unconscious levels of the group matrix. The theoretical approach of the group–analytic music therapy model is based on the group–analytic theories developed by Foulkes (1964, 1984, 1990), Kreeger(1991), Kennard (2000), Pines (1991), Dalai (1998), Salmmen (1997) and Dalai (1998). The music therapy methods include receptive music listening and imagination (Bruscia 2000; Bonny 1975; Ahonen–Eerikäinen 1996, 1997a, 1997b), referential and non–referential improvisation (Bruscia 1987, 1998ab; Pavlicevic 1997) and integrated art and music therapy methods (Ahonen–Eerikäinen 1994).

Citation:

Ahonen-Eerikainen, Heidi (2002) Group‑analytic music therapy. Nordic Journal of Music Therapy. 11(1), 48‑54.


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Using Group‑Analytic Supervision Approach When Supervising Music Therapists

Using Group‑Analytic Supervision Approach When Supervising Music Therapists

Ahonen-Eerikainen, Heidi (2003)

Abstract

This paper will introduce a group–analytic music therapy supervision model, which I have developed and practised as a clinical supervisor with music therapists, music therapy students, creative art therapists and psychotherapists since 1995. The theoretical approach of the model is based on my experiences as a trainee of group–analysis at the Psychotherapy Institute of the Finnish Mental Health Association (1995–1999), the psychoanalytical group–analytic theories (Foulkes, 1964, 1984, 1990; Sharpe, 1995; Tsegos, 1993, 1995), Balint–theory (Drees & Akkanen–von Stein, 1994; Trenkel, 1994ab; Knoepfel, 1994), and the Group–Analytic Music Therapy Model (Ahonen–Eerikainen 2002). Every group–analytic music therapy supervision meeting is a creative process in which the group members learn to concentrate on their inner images, physical sensations and feelings. The goal is to expand participant’s understanding about the therapeutic relationship and its various aspects and elements.

See also:
Workshop: Group Analytic Music Therapy Supervision Workshop
Using Group-Analytic Supervision Approach when Supervising Music Therapists

Citation:

Ahonen-Eerikainen, Heidi (2003) Using Group‑Analytic Supervision Approach When Supervising Music Therapists. Nordic Journal of Music Therapy. 12(2), 173‑183.


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Musically Elicited Images as Unique Clinical Data during the Process of Group Analysis with Traumatized Adults

Musically Elicited Images as Unique Clinical Data during the Process of Group Analysis with Traumatized Adults

Ahonen-Eerikainen, Heidi (2004)

Abstract

This paper will discuss the clinical use of musically elicited images – the referential imagery brought up either by therapeutic music listening or clinical improvisation, and created during music therapy. Clinical abstracts of group analytic music therapy will be presented to highlight the reconstruction of traumatic experiences and to illustrated the function of musically elicited images as visualized metaphorical condensations of client’s ideas and feelings. The analysis of these images provides a unique opportunity for insight and integration. They connect the client into his/her feeling self, bring up associations, and help to provide a window into events and feelings, which might otherwise be closed. My theoretical approach is based on the psychoanalytical group analytic theories (Foulkes, 1964, 1990, Foulkes & Anthony, 1990) and self-psychological aspects (Harwood 1988ab). The model of the mind that serves as a frame of reference for the coments that comprise the remainder of this paper draws mainly on Freyd (1900), Dowling (1987), Eisnitz (19878), Gillman (1987), Ornstein (19878), Pines (1988, 1996, 2003), Rangell (1987), and Rothsein (1987)

Citation:

Ahonen-Eerikainen, Heidi (2004) Musically Elicited Images as Unique Clinical Data during the Process of Group Analysis with Traumatized Adults. British Journal of Music Therapy. Vol. 18/1, 24‑29.


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Physioacoustic therapy: placebo effect on recovery from exercise-induced muscle damage

Physioacoustic therapy: placebo effect on recovery from exercise-induced muscle damage

By Tiidus, P.M, , Markoulakis, R., Murray, D., Pamela J. Bryden, P.J, Ahonen-Eerikäinen, H. (2008)

 

Abstract

We evaluated claims that physioacoustic therapy can enhance muscle healing following damaging exercise. Untrained subjects were randomly assigned to control (C), placebo (P) or treatment (T) groups. All groups performed 70 eccentric triceps contractions followed by; no treatment (C), sham physioacoustic treatment (P), or actual physioacoustic therapy (T) on days 1-4 post-exercise. Muscle soreness and isometric and concentric triceps peak torque were determined pre-exercise and on days 1-4 and 7 post-exercise. The T group received physioacoustic therapy for 30 min/day on the treatment days. The P group believed they received physioacoustic therapy, although the chairs, were turned off. Peak torques were depressed (P Keywords: muscle soreness, physioacoustic therapy, placebo effect, muscle damage

Citation:

Tiidus, P.M, , Markoulakis, R., Murray, D., Pamela J. Bryden, P.J, Ahonen-Eerikäinen, H. (2008) 1Physioacoustic therapy: placebo effect on recovery from exercise-induced muscle damage. Acta Kinesiologiae Universitatis Tartuensis Vol. 13, pp. 117-128. (Toivo Jurimae Ed.).Tartu University Press. Estonia.


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Short-term effects of vibration therapy on motor impairments in Parkinson’s disease

Short-term effects of vibration therapy on motor impairments in Parkinson’s disease.

Lauren K. King; Quincy J. Almeida; Heidi Ahonen

Abstract

Recent studies have suggested that vibration therapy may have a positive influence on motor symptoms in individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, quantitative evidence of these benefits is scarce, and the concept of “whole-body” vibration in these studies is vague. The objectives of the current study were to evaluate the influence of vibration on motor symptoms and functional measures in PD by delivering sound waves to the entire body. We delivered whole body sound wave vibration to 40 individuals with PD using a Physioacoustic Chair, a piece of equipment with speakers spaced throughout the chair permitting a series of programmed low frequency sound waves through the body. Using a parallel cross-over design we utilized the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), quantitative gait assessments, and a grooved pegboard for upper limb control. Improvements were seen in all symptom, motor control and functional outcome measures at the time of assessment. Specifically, a significant decrease in rigidity, and tremor were shown, as well as a significant increase in step length and improved speed on the grooved pegboard task. Results of this initial investigation provide support for vibration therapy as a non-pharmacological treatment alternative. Long-term benefits of vibration therapy will require further research.

Citation:

King, Lauren K., Almeida, Quincy J., Ahonen, H. (2009) Short-term effects of vibration therapy on motor impairments in Parkinson’s disease. NeuroRehabilitation, Vol. 25, No. 4. (2009), pp. 297-306.


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thumbnail Jerusalem International Integrative Medicine Conference, Israel. May 13-18, 2012 article post

Experiential Workshop: Emptying Containers With Music

EMPTYING CONTAINERS WITH MUSIC: USING MUSIC TO EXPLORE THE SOURCE OF VICARIOUS TRAUMA...
article post
thumbnail Musiikki – sanaton kieli : musiikkiterapian perusteet: Finnish article post
thumbnail Different Forms of Music Therapy and Working Styles of Music Therapists— A qualitative study article post

Group‑analytic Music Therapy Paper

Group‑analytic music therapy Ahonen-Eerikainen, Heidi (2002) Abstract This paper will...
article post

Using Group‑Analytic Supervision Approach When Supervising Music Therapists

Using Group‑Analytic Supervision Approach When Supervising Music...
article post

Musically Elicited Images as Unique Clinical Data during the Process of Group Analysis with Traumatized Adults

Musically Elicited Images as Unique Clinical Data during the Process of Group Analysis...
article post

Physioacoustic therapy: placebo effect on recovery from exercise-induced muscle damage

Physioacoustic therapy: placebo effect on recovery from exercise-induced muscle damage By...
article post

Short-term effects of vibration therapy on motor impairments in Parkinson’s disease

Short-term effects of vibration therapy on motor impairments in Parkinson’s...
article post